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Schmidt Artist Lofts – Housing Development NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to Dominium on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Housing Development for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Schmidt Artist Lofts – St. Paul, MN

The Schmidt Brewery has been an important part of history in the city of St. Paul, Minn. providing jobs to the residents of the neighborhood for nearly 100 years. Originally built as the Cave Brewery, the Schmidt Brewery has been home to the Stahlmann, North Star, Pfeiffer, Jacob Schmidt and Landmark brands. The last kegs that rolled out of the location in 2002 were filled with Grain Belt and Pig’s Eye brew. After a stint as an ethanol processing plant, Schmidt Brewery sat vacant until a massive community and developer effort resulted in a plan for revitalization of the brewery’s 16 acres and the creation of Schmidt Artist Lofts. The Schmidt Artist Lofts has 260 total housing units including 247 loft-style units in the brewery’s former “Brew House” and “Bottle House” as well as 13 townhomes. All 260 units are section 42 housing, providing affordable living for members of St. Paul’s vibrant artist community; units are available to artists of all disciplines. The project utilized a variety of funding sources to make the project viable including $30.9 million in Low Income Housing Tax Credits, $21.1 million in State Historic Tax Credits and $21.1 million in Federal Historic Tax Credits. Dominium also worked closely with state and community groups to bring the project to completion. This included the West 7th Street/ Fort Road Federation, the City of Saint Paul, the Metropolitan Council, Ramsey County and the MN Department of Employment & Economic Development (DEED). This broad community effort resulted in a development project that revitalized a long-vacant historic site and now provides strong community value.

Residents are impacted by the support of St. Paul’s local culture plus the added culture that Schmidt Artist Lofts provide. This project is designed to take advantage of the building’s natural light, high ceilings and existing character to provide inspiring live/work spaces for its artist residents. The building itself is noted by architectural historians for its crenellated towers and Gothic details. Former industrial and brewing uses in the various buildings provide opportunity for every one of the 247 loft units to have its own layout and personality. The Schmidt Artist Lofts also address the pressing need for affordable housing in St. Paul. All 260 units provide affordable living options, with 234 of the units at 60 percent of the Average Median Income (AMI) and 26 units at 50 percent of AMI. With intentions of catering to the artist community, common space at Schmidt Artist Lofts will provide space for artist residents to work. Residents can take advantage of numerous unique studios tailored to yoga/Pilates, dance, paint, pottery, play/performance, sound and media. These studios incorporate additional features of state-of-the-art kilns, advanced acoustics, lighting capabilities, Wi-Fi, projectors, and the latest in sound recording/mixing equipment. Residents also enjoy a fully equipped fitness center and multiple galleries to showcase artwork. At Schmidt Artist

Lofts, common areas provide opportunity for residents to network with fellow artists. With art and culture a central feature of St. Paul’s community, the Schmidt Artist Lofts provide a unique living option for the community’s artists to live and work together in an affordable setting.

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Creekside Village, Ltd. – Housing Development NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to Nebraska Finance Investment Authority on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Housing Development Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Creekside Village, Ltd. – Lincoln, NE

Creekside Village is located just north of the Lincoln, Nebraska downtown business district and is nestled between the University of Nebraska Lincoln campus and the Haymarket Park Sports Complex.  The development consists of 18 buildings providing 71 units of affordable housing to a variety of residents.  Eight multifamily buildings provide 30 one-bedroom units, 30 two-bedroom units, and one manager’s unit.  The additional 10 buildings are constructed as 4-bedroom, single family townhomes, utilizing the rent-to-own “CROWN” (Credits-to-OWN) program offered by the Nebraska Investment Finance Authority (NIFA).  The development includes a club house with meeting and community space and laundry facilities. All 71 units of the development target low income tenants at 60% or less of the Area Median Income. Twenty units are reserved for occupancy by people with Severe Mental Illnesses. Comprehensive supportive services and specialized case management are provided to residents, both onsite and offsite. To further enhance the project and the surrounding area, the developer, Hoppe Homes, coordinated with the City of Lincoln to convert 18 acres of green space into a community park.

An underutilized piece of land presented a rare opportunity to extend an older established neighborhood by integrating a new affordable housing development to create a cohesive and unique living environment.  The site was originally home to an old, asbestos ridden US Navy depot, shooting range and maintenance garage, all of which had to be removed prior to the commencement of any development.  Substantial fill dirt was required to be brought in to raise the level of the site to address flood plain issues. Creekside Village incorporates 20 units that offer an independent living environment for individuals with Severe Mental Illness (SMI), which is an aspect of affordable housing development that, while challenging, is critically needed and very important. CenterPointe Inc., a Lincoln nonprofit, provides extensive supportive services, both onsite and offsite, for the SMI residents of Creekside Village. Single family, multifamily and special needs housing, when combined as part of the same development, can create a vibrant and diverse community. For individuals with Severe Mental Illness, living independently in an integrated environment is a goal that can be obtained with the supportive services that Creekside Village provides.

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Cheryl Chow Court – Housing Development NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to Low Income Housing Institute on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Housing Development Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Cheryl Chow Court – Homeless and Low-Income Senior Housing – Seattle, WA

The Low Income Housing Institute (LIHI) has recently completed Cheryl Chow Court, a 51-unit apartment building on a prime piece of vacant land in the heart of Ballard, Washington – a Seattle neighborhood with a sizable population of elderly citizens.  This six-story property has 50 HUD-subsidized units for low-income and homeless seniors and one for an on-site manager.  There are 25 studios and 26 one-bedroom units. The large and bright studios and one-bedroom apartments include a full kitchen and bath, including level-entry showers. The apartments are accessible for those with mobility challenges and accessible to the hearing and sight impaired. The apartment’s green features include low-flow fixtures, dual-flush toilets, energy-efficient light fixtures and energy-efficient appliances. The residential portion of the building is set back allowing the residents to enjoy the street life on the front porch and has a back porch for community activities.  It also features a community room, a computer room, and offices for a case manager, who is providing supportive services, and property manager.  The property features a rooftop deck with a P-Patch garden and stunning views of the surrounding mountain ranges and the city. There is seating along with areas for composting and rain barrels. LIHI is delighted to provide affordable senior housing in one of the most attractive, livable, and walk-able neighborhoods in Seattle. Cheryl Chow Court is located down the street from the Ballard Public Library and Ballard Commons, and is close to Swedish Ballard Hospital, shopping and many amenities. The building will also have an Urban Rest Stop (URS) facility on the first floor of the building with a separate entrance.  The URS will provide free showers, laundry and restrooms to homeless men, women and children.

The completion of Cheryl Chow Court opened up 50 units of greatly needed permanent supportive housing to homeless and low-income seniors.   The 2015 One Night Count of the Homeless found that there was a 22% increase in the number of homeless people in King County over 2014.  According to the Aging and Disability Services, close to 1,000 seniors are homeless in King County and the demand for government subsidized rental properties for seniors far outweighs the current and planned future supply.In the first two to three days after our outreach letter was sent, 200 applications were received. The following 10 days brought approximately 50 more. Of those applications, half were homeless seniors and long-term shelter staying seniors. The waitlist had to be closed within two weeks of it opening.  As of January 31st, we have 26 occupied units with 14 of those homeless seniors. The remaining 25 units will be occupied by March 20th with an anticipated 6 more homeless seniors.

According to the Area Agency on Aging for Seattle and King County 2010 Census, 312,624 people age 60 and above now live in King County, up 30 percent since 2000. By 2025, the number of King County residents over age 60 will exceed 496,000. Nearly one in four county residents will be age 65 or older. Cheryl Chow Court is targeted to homeless and very low-income seniors (62 years and older).  The seniors are capable of living independently. As the resident population ages and the health conditions of the residents change, the supportive services we provide will help the residents to remain in their apartments.  Some “independent” elderly may become “nearly independent”, “nearly frail” or “frail”, and be at risk of premature institutionalization. Cheryl Chow Court is a much needed affordable option for seniors in an expensive neighborhood.

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CAMBA Gardens- Housing Development NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to CAMBA Housing Ventures, Inc on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Housing Development Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

CAMBA Gardens – Brooklyn, NY

CAMBA Gardens (CG) is a $66.8 million, 209 unit, LEED Platinum, transit-oriented, new construction, affordable and supportive housing development located on the Kings County Hospital Center (KCHC) campus in Wingate, Brooklyn. CG is an award-winning, innovative, national model for a partnership between a public hospital, non-profit developer, and social service provider.

CAMBA Housing Ventures (CHV), created by CAMBA, Inc. in 2005, is a NYC non-profit affordable housing developer that has in the pipeline, created and/or partnered on 1,527 units, representing $509M in public/private investment.  CHV partnered with KCHC and NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) in response to surplus hospital property identified as an opportunity for affordable supportive housing and an increased patient base. This unique partnership addresses a diverse set of community needs and was centered on a 2005 Corporation for Supportive Housing white paper, to create housing as healthcare. CG reduces public costs by decreasing use of homeless shelters and emergency rooms, provides sustainable and affordable housing, and connects lowincome and formerly homeless households to CAMBA social services and KCHC preventative healthcare resources that improve health outcomes. CG leveraged competitive public and private financing to create 207 units of affordable housing with on-site social services provided by CAMBA for both individuals and families earning under 60% AMI (61 Units) and homeless individuals and families exiting NYC’s overburdened shelter system (146 Units). CG provides 132 studio, 29 one-bedroom, 31 two-bedroom, and 15 three-bedroom apartments across two buildings (including 2 units for on-site superintendents).Completed in October 2013, CG spurred construction and permanent job creation, exceeded MWBE goals and responded to housing needs of community residents and homeless individuals. CHV is focused on design excellence, sustainability and innovation to de-stigmatize affordable and supportive housing, in addition to providing valuable amenities for both residents and the community.

 

CAMBA Gardens (CG) responds to a critical need for affordable and supportive housing in Brooklyn and NYC. A 2014 NYS Comptroller’s study found that over 50% of Brooklyn rental households pay over 30% of their income on rent, and nearly 30% of Brooklyn rental households pay over 50% of their income on rent. In addition, the NYC homeless shelter population is at a record high of 58,267 individuals, including 24,588 children. This critical need for housing combined with CHV’s extensive outreach efforts produced over 7,000 applications for 61 available community units at CG. CHV further ensured that resident needs were met through its community participation processes. Working with funders to include lease-up preferences that responded to local needs, CHV included preferences for Brooklyn Community District 9 and 17 residents, Kings County Hospital Center (KCHC) employees, and households impacted by Superstorm Sandy. CAMBA’s on-site social services available to all tenants, also helps ensure that residents are achieving their goals. CG also produced a powerful economic impact on the surrounding region by generating construction jobs for 59 Brooklyn residents and 42 permanent jobs (over 50% for Brooklyn residents).  CHV worked with a Brooklyn based General Contractor to hire 81 Brooklyn subcontractors and vendors who employed 1,166 Brooklyn residents.  Over $19 million in contracts were awarded to Brooklyn contract ors and over 19.7% of the construction contracts were awarded to MWBEs. CHV also partnered with ArtBridge to integrate local rtwork with affordable housing. Together, CHV and ArtBridge placed art along the construction fence including pieces from 4 Brooklyn artists. Common areas also feature local artists. CG received unanimous support from Brooklyn Community Board 9, KCHC Community Advisory Board, HHC Board, City Council and was funded by the Brooklyn Borough President and Councilmember Mathieu Eugene.

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Bigham Leatherberry Wise- Housing Development NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to People’s Emergency Center on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Housing Development Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Bigham Leatherberry Wise – Philadelphia, PA

Bigham Leatherberry Wise is an affordable housing development for formerly homeless women with special needs and their children as well as moderate-income households in the West Powelton neighborhood of Philadelphia. This project, a combination of new construction and renovation, has eliminated several blighted properties and created new affordable housing options in this rapidly revitalizing neighborhood. This project combines innovative design and community outreach in an effort to advance equity in a comprehensive and collaborative way. A comprehensive design review process with nearby neighbors has resulted in additional streetscape improvements, including façade improvements for existing homeowners, new planters and window boxes, and street lanterns. Green design elements such as a rain garden and Energy Star appliances have been incorporated into the project to promote energy conservation and stormwater retention.

Bigham Leatherberry Wise has transformed  4226-32 Powelton Avenue, a large vacant lot in West Philadelphia, into a 8,406 square foot, two-story building. This new construction contains two 900 sq. foot two-bedroom units and five 1,150 sq. foot three-bedroom units, for a total of 7 units. This project also includes the renovation of an adjacent 4,970 square foot three-story building at 4231 Filbert Street, which includes two 700 sq. foot two-bedroom units and two 950 sq. foot two-bedroom units, equaling a combined 11 total units.The target population for the 7 units of new construction is formerly homeless women with special needs and their children who have household incomes at 50 percent of the area median income or less. The additional 4 rehabbed units are for moderate-income households earning 80 percent of the area median income or less. This project includes a total of 27 bedrooms (six 2-bedroom units and five 3-bedroom units), serving anywhere between 27 and 54 individuals per year.

Bigham Leatherberry Wise continues PEC’s goals of alleviating poverty, eliminating blight, and helping those experiencing homelessness by providing much-needed affordable supportive housing. With 42% of Philadelphia households living on low incomes, thousands living in overcrowded conditions, and long lists for public housing assistance, the need for affordable housing in Philadelphia exceeds the supply by 60,000 units. This puts households of all kinds in the difficult situation of finding housing that is not only affordable but also appropriate for their unique needs and circumstances. For homeless families with children, which now accounts for over a quarter of the homeless population, there is an estimated gap of more than 7,000 beds in permanent supportive housing. This project helps address that need.

The need and desire for Bigham Leatherberry Wise was recently reinforced during the creation of the Make Your Mark! Lower Lancaster Revitalization Plan in 2012. This plan recommended redeveloping vacant properties on Powelton Avenue, a corridor that connects West Powelton with more affluent neighborhoods to the east, and specifically identifies this site in front of Drexel University’s Athletic Complex as a place in need of redevelopment. West Powelton has faced many challenges typical of long-term disinvestment in urban neighborhoods: low incomes and educational attainment, high poverty and unemployment rates, few homeowners, many vacant properties, and scarce goods and services. However, this neighborhood has retained extraordinary assets that make revitalization a real possibility, the beginnings of which can be seen today. Due in large part to the influence of nearby universities such as Drexel and the University of Pennsylvania, West Powelton has seen dramatic rises in housing costs in the past decade. Residents have expressed fear of gentrification, giving a new urgency to create affordable housing and to preserve the diversity of the neighborhood.

 

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Severn Peanut Company- Job Creation NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to Severn Peanut Company on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Job Creation Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Severn Peanut Company – Severn, NC

Severn Peanut Company, dba Hampton Farms is a leading producer of peanut consumer products.  These products include peanut butter, granulated peanuts, and roasted in-shell peanuts. The products are sold in grocery chains, ballparks, produce markets, etc, throughout the United States and Canada. The company proposed making a large financial investment in a new in-shell processing facility along with peanut roasting, drying, inspection, and packaging equipment.   This expansion would allow an increase in our production capabilities of salted-in-shell peanuts. It would also allow us to continue production in the new facility while the current plant facility underwent renovation.  This would aid in retaining the current 85 employees while the new facility would create an additional 46 jobs. The expansion facility would also allow Hampton Farms to continue on its upward growth curve, thereby providing stable twelve month employment for the inhabitants of Northampton County, N. C. and the surrounding areas.

The addition of 46 jobs is healthy for the local economy which has limited employment opportunities. From Gary Brown, Northampton County Economic Development Officer: “The Town of Severn (2010 population 275) is one of nine municipalities in Northampton County (2010 population 22,095), a low-wealth minority majority county located in northeastern North Carolina.  Historically, the economy of Northampton County was dominated by labor intensive agriculture where educational attainment and worker training was low.  However, Severn Peanut Company, founded by natives of the region, invested in manufacturing operations in Northampton County.  The company’s desire was to close the employment gap and create gainful employment opportunities for workers with limited training and work experience while sustaining a fiscally sound enterprise. Common to businesses located in non-metropolitan areas, growth of the company was hampered by substantially limited local government financial resources to support business development.” Employees and their families, who had no industry provided benefits, will now have paid vacation, paid sick days, access to health insurance, dental insurance (if selected), short and long term disability insurance, 401 (k) company paid additions to the employee contribution, and life insurance.  Employees, who have no food industry experience, will be exposed to training in FDA requirements, HACCP, sanitation procedures, good manufacturing practices, and food safety standards.

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Makah Commercial Fishing Dock- Job Creation NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalist

 

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Congratulations to The Makah Tribe on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Job Creation Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Makah Commercial Fishing Dock – Neah Bay, WA

The Makah Indian Tribe used a combination of Tribal funds, an EDA grant and a NMTC allocation to reconstruct a badly damaged commercial fishing dock on tribal land in the Port of Neah Bay at the northwest tip of Washington state.  Originally constructed in 1952 for use by commercial fishing vessels to offload their catch, the concrete and creosote dock had been in a state of significant disrepair and a recent failure had essentially shut it down for all activity. The dock is a major source of income for the Makah tribe, a community numbering fewer than 3,000 located on the remote coast of northwest Washington.   It supports a diverse array of tribal and non-tribal businesses and a regional fish processing industry that includes some 90 different Small Businesses, mostly Minority Business Enterprises.   The $13.7M project involved demolishing and removing approximately 504 reosote-treated timber piles along with the 120 foot long dock and warehouse buildings and replacing them with new concrete and steel pilings, new causeway, several loading cranes and a new dock building with remote controlled ice loading capability.  Construction involved a significant amount of in-water work on this remote coastal site which endures extreme winter weather from the Pacific.  Permitting required the coordination of no fewer than six different federal, state and local agencies to ensure the protection of the fragile marine ecosystem during the process.

The benefits to the tribal economy, the 90 small business enterprises and the more than 400 jobs they employ cannot be overstated.  The Tribe is dependent on the operation of this facility as a key revenue generating activity for its tribal economy. Presently, some 8 million pounds of fish and shellfish valued at $6.5-7 million cross the Neah Bay dock annually.  The structurally upgraded dock and new ice house facility will benefit the tribe with reduced operating and maintenance costs and increased environmental sustainability. It will also benefit the small businesses that use it with greatly increased efficiency, access to secure cold storage and improved wholesale facilities for their catch.  In addition, the 90 different small business enterprises collectively provide more than 400 FTE jobs.  The dock replacement project supplies new capacity and cost effectiveness to help the local area and region expand its fishing industry, create new jobs and increase the economic competitiveness of Pacific Northwest fisheries resources.  The primary advantages that the Neah Bay dock has over other ports in the region are its ideal location, its brand-ability and a more varied market demand. With respect to the location, Neah Bay is in close proximity to the Strait of Juan de Fuca which is an area of high activity for a variety of fish runs. The ability for fishing vessels to launch from here and return with their catch rather than driving boats 90 miles or more out of their way means significant fuel savings for the commercial vessels that harvest in this area. In addition, the Neah Bay caught varieties (in particular, troll caught Halibut and others) have developed a brand identify for their location that commands a premium price over fish off-loaded in other areas.

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Economic Prosperity Center- Job Creation NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

 

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Congratulations to Corporation to Develop Communities of Tampa, Inc on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Job Creation Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Economic Prosperity Center – Tampa, FL

Corporation to Develop Communities (CDC) of Tampa, Inc. subscribes to an expansive approach to job creation that acknowledges the essential ingredient to easing the bonds of financial strain is employment; however, employment alone does not lead to self-sufficiency and sustainable community revitalization. As such, CDC of Tampa, Inc. harnesses the resources and expertise of eighteen (18) local organizations under the auspices of a collective impact initiative entitled, “Economic Prosperity Center” (EPC). The EPC, located at four sites throughout the county, fully encompasses a multi-faceted continuum of three core service areas with a focus on job creation, self-sufficiency, and personal wealth: 1. Employment Placement and Career Advancement; 2. Financial Coaching and Counseling; and 3. Income Supports. Taken together, these three core services, known as integrated, bundled services help move low-income families along a continuum of improvements aimed at ultimately increasing their net income and worth through job creation, long-term job retention, and improved financial behaviors. In addition to the provision of job skills training and placement, the EPC also addresses the ongoing financial needs of an individual and/or family. Many consumers of the EPC rely upon check cashing and payday loan businesses. Doing so reduces their income and spending power, thereby decreasing their ability to maximize their newly generated income. Individuals are also unaware of resources that may aid them in creating and attaining savings goals and homeownership. Helping individuals harness financial knowledge increases their personal wealth. As barriers to employment are mitigated through the EPC, job placement and retention become highly viable. The concurrent financial coaching and income supports equip EPC consumers with the tools to establish long-term financial goals that support their ability to invest in a sustainable future.

The EPC model is responsive to workforce needs of Hillsborough County. As of July 2014, the unemployment rate in the Tampa-St Pete area was 6.8%. The rate masks the struggle of those who remain unemployed or who are underemployed and earning a low to modest wage and incapable of building wealth and assets. The multiplier effect of unemployment compounds issues plaguing the area such as high rates of foreclosures, vacancies, crime and decreased consumer spending.  The EPC target areas represent the lowest income neighborhoods throughout Hillsborough County. Over 75% of the population are minority residents and, unlike the surrounding communities, the area has drastically lower income rates and much higher levels of unemployment. The target areas represent the lowest income areas with a per capita average household income of only $11,059.The poverty rate for the area is higher than more than 90% of neighborhoods across the US. Those who are employed in the area are often considered the working poor and labeled underemployed. In Hillsborough, a county known for its tourists and service industries, underemployment is prevalent and continues to persist. The pool of candidates seeking a job is also disproportionately skewed with the majority of service industry workers lacking the skills to secure a higher paying, high skilled job.

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Continental Tire Sumter- Job Creation NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

Congratulations to Continental Tires of the Americas, Community Reinvestment Fund and People Incorporated on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Job Creation Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Continental Tire Sumter – Sumter, SC

In October of 2011, Continental executives along with the Governor of South Carolina announced a new passenger/light truck tire manufacturing facility in Sumter, SC. The announcement ended an six month site selection process where the Continental team evaluated 12 states and 2 countries.  Critical to selecting the best location for the new facility was finding a location that could accommodate the plant dimensions in addition to providing the needed water, sewer, road, rail, and port infrastructure.  The ideal location also had to be  a place where Continental could find, recruit and train a quality workforce in a state and community that would support Continental and manufacturing for the life of the facility. Site preparation for the plant began almost immediately and by June of 2012, a construction team had been selected and footings were being completed.  The Continental team has constructed the 1 million square foot plant, coordinated and installed customized tire building equipment, and hired/trained the start up team.  The hard work paid off because in October 2013 the Sumter plant got corporate approval to begin production, three months ahead of schedule. In January 2014, Governor Haley and company executives returned to Sumter to celebrate the official grand opening of the facility. Today the facility is continuing to improve in all areas. There are approximately 625 employees of the 1,600 that will be employed by 2021. Training and recruiting are ongoing. The tires made in the Sumter facility are being shipped to customers across the United States, Canada and Mexico.

Sumter County, SC is a community of just over 108,000 with more than half of the citizens being minorities and more than 17% living at the poverty level.  The announcement of Continental was met with huge excitement. Sumter citizens lined Main Street to welcome company executives in October of 2011 after the announcement. Almost immediately, Sumter felt the impact of Continental.  Local businesses including hotels and restaurants have seen a surge in business.   A Starbucks has opened. Hardware stores and other retailers have benefited as ex-pats arrived in the community. Continental’s investment is the largest single private investment in Sumter County by a factor of ten. Continental will spend more than a half billion dollars creating and populating its million-square-foot facility, which doubled the community’s manufacturing footprint. In January 2014, Continental announced that over $100,000,000 had already been spent with local companies just during the construction. By 2020, Continental will be the community’s largest private employer and will pay nearly $3,000,000 annually in local taxes.  According to a statement released by NDC, “The jobs are expected to pay wages 25 percent higher than the median income earned in Sumter and spur more than $670 million in related economic activity in the area.” In 2011, the county unemployment rate was 11% as of December 2014. It is down to 6.8% and per capita income has increased 11.3% since 2011, from $29,915 to $33,310 in 2013. Continental has also donated more than $50,000 to local charities including a $25,000 donation to the Sumter County School District, a long-term commitment to Poinsett State Park to restore bicycle trails, and sponsored volunteer days at local organizations including Habitat for Humanity and the YWCA.

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City of Coldwater / Clemens Food Group Expansion – Job Creation NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to Michigan Economic Development Corporation on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Job Creation Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

City of Coldwater / Clemens Food Group Expansion – City of Coldwater, MI

A three-year collaboration between Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) and Michigan pork producers culminated in a grant to conduct a feasibility assessment for a pork producing plant in Michigan. Drawing on the merits of the plan, the pork producers group secured a processing partner, Clemens Food Group. Clemens Food Group is a Pennsylvania-based, sixth-generation, family-owned integrated pork production operation, including farming, processing, transportation and logistics.  Clemens’ products are sold through grocers, food-service distributors, and consumer packaged goods companies, primarily in the northeastern and mid-Atlantic regions of the United States.

In their site exploration to determine where to locate a new pork-processing plant, Clemens partnered with a range of family-owned pork producers with farms in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana. Clemens’ decision was based on considering the advantages of a potential expansion of their processing capacity into the Midwest compared to the benefits of adding capacity with physical expansions on-site in Eastern Pennsylvania or the Mid-Atlantic/Southwest United States.

The company’s search focused on Michigan and Ohio for the potential Midwest location. Each location was within a two-hour (driving) radius to all pork producers engaged in the project. (NOTE: Partnering pork producers in Ohio and Michigan provide a significant percentage of hogs in the pork-producing process.)  In addition to state and community support when selecting the final location, Clemens considered site feasibility and labor force preparedness.

The new facility will be located on a greenfield site in the City of Coldwater. Currently, the site does not have infrastructure in place to support the project. The Coldwater location will require the following infrastructure improvements: extensions to the Community’s water and sanitary sewer mains and extension of a new municipal electric overhead distribution line.  In addition, the community was required to have a trained workforce available to meet the company’s employment ramp-up schedule and ongoing training support for newly hired workers.

A comprehensive incentive package to secure the project was based on a partnership between the state and local community.  The deal included local investment for infrastructure upgrades, community development block grants, property tax abatements, road improvement grants, and job training funds. The CDBG funds will be used to assist with municipal infrastructure extensions, property acquisition, workforce development and on-the-job training. The community will fund the electrical extension and a portion of the new water main and sanitary sewer main to the new Clemens’ site.

In addition to the direct benefits of significant job creation and investment, the project plays a major role in building and diversifying Michigan’s economy and the global pork market. Specifically, the project is a catalyst in the development of the state’s agribusiness and food economy.

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Announcing our NDC Academy 2015 Day 1 Keynote Speaker

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NDC is pleased to announce that the Honorable John Engler, President of the Business Roundtable, will be the keynote speaker at the NDC Academy’s Networking Luncheon at Noon on Tuesday, May 12.

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1102 Atlantic Avenue Industrial Center- Job Creation NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center and Enterprise Community Partners on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Job Creation Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities.

1102 Atlantic Avenue Industrial Center – Brooklyn, NY

The Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center (GMDC) is the premier nonprofit industrial developer in New York City. By purchasing and renovating dilapidated industrial buildings, GMDC has helped preserve and create hundreds of jobs for low-income New workers and has provided a strong anchor for future outside investment.  Since its inception in 1992, GMDC has rehabilitated seven Brooklyn manufacturing buildings for occupancy by small manufacturing enterprises and artisans. Currently GMDC owns and manages five of these properties, which together represent more than 586,000 square feet of space. These buildings are occupied by 110 businesses that employ more than 550 people. The 1102 Atlantic Avenue Industrial Center is GMDC’s latest project: the renovation of a former auto parts warehouse facility in the Crown Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn into a multi-tenanted manufacturing center. The $14.7 million development project entails the rehabilitation of this two-story, 50,000 square foot industrial property and the creation of production space for small and mid-sized manufacturers. These units will be marketed specifically to businesses that seek the location a land market advantages of New York City. Once fully built out, the project will provide space for approximately 14 new businesses and 76 new or retained jobs for workers making an average of$47,000 per year. This is well above living wage standards and higher than average for both the retail and food service sectors in New York.  The project will address New York City’s growing emphasis on locally manufactured products by marketing to traditional GMDC tenants such as woodworkers, cabinet makers, artisanal trades such as set and custom frame builders, metal workers and garment makers.

Small manufacturing businesses are now proliferating in New York, and the City has made efforts to encourage and retain these businesses, but the realities of the New York real estate market make finding affordable production space very difficult. Industrial real estate remains expensive in spite of the economic downturn, and there is much less industrially-zoned land as a result of a decade of rezoning efforts conceived primarily to facilitate other uses in manufacturing districts. GMDC’s new project will offer a haven to small businesses by offering affordable rents, long-term leases, and the opportunity to build business networks. The project will bring new jobs to the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, a neighborhood that has high rates of poverty and unemployment.  The project directly addresses multiple community priorities, including the creation or retention of 102 full-time jobs during construction and 76 permanent manufacturing jobs and investment in a low-income urban community. The project will also incorporate sustainable elements, including LEED Certification and a photovoltaic system on the roof.  The proposed manufacturing facility will address a host of critical issues facing the neighborhood of Crown Heights, the borough of Brooklyn, the City of New York, and the region as a whole. GMDC will focus on marketing the new facility to small and mid-sized manufacturing companies. Manufacturing has made a recent return as one of New York City’s most profitable sectors, offering employees above living wage salaries and opportunities for business growth, largely due to the vastness of the city’s market. New York City also offers a very strong labor force, often immigrant-based, which is key to the success of these businesses.

Read More HERE!

Small Business Entrepreneurship at the 5th Street Arcades- Creative Financing NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

Congratulations to ­­­­The City of Cleveland on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Creative Finance Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Small Business Entrepreneurship at the 5th Street Arcades  - Cleveland, OH

Located in the heart of Downtown Cleveland along one of Euclid Avenue’s most prominent stretches, the former Colonial and Euclid Arcades, built over 100 years ago during Cleveland’s industrial power, were once a largely vacant and underutilized building in 2012. Recently, Cumberland Development LLC, the project developer, rebranded and redeveloped this historic building, taking abandoned space that was almost 60% vacant in 2012 to nearly 100% occupancy today. The Arcades are almost entirely occupied with tenants (one vacant storefront) with local retailers, merchants, cafés and sustainable start-up businesses. Over the past year, the 5th Street Arcades have become a retail incubator in Downtown Cleveland. The project has brought critical retail and life back into the core City. Cumberland Arcades, LLC was formed to manage and develop the old Colonial –Euclid Arcades. Due to the high vacancy, the City of Cleveland, Downtown Cleveland Alliance, Charter One Bank and the developer came together to create  a small business grant competition for small locally-owned entrepreneurs to apply for grant funding, free or low rent and forgivable loans. Five applicants were initially selected and received grants from $1,500 to $5,000. After the branding was approved, new improvements were made to the historic building including new lighting and signage. The initial entrepreneurs opened their businesses which included a chocolatier, a furniture maker that made all of their products from reclaimed wood; a sushi café, a retailer that makes hand-woven baby clothes from organic cotton; and a coffee shop featuring locally made bakery. The initial opening of the start-up businesses led to additional entrepreneurs filling the vacant storefront spaces.  Today, the 5th Street Arcades are made up of a diverse group of businesses which includes minority-owned, female-owned, LGBT, and immigrant businesses.  Except for one challenging storefront, the building is full.

The project, which is almost fully leased and occupied except for one storefront, is a big success to bringing retail back to Downtown Cleveland. The project has created 115 new additional jobs in the heart of the City along Euclid Avenue. Many of the jobs are the entrepreneurs that own and operate their business. One of the female-owned businesses, Sand Buffie Design, relocated from Charleston South Carolina with her husband to take advantage of the opportunity to start her dream business.  She also currently resides in Downtown with her husband and walks to work every day to operate her boutique. The entrepreneurs that opened the shops are a diverse group of individuals representing minority-owned businesses, female-owned business, LGBT-owned businesses and immigrant businesses that have come from all corners of the globe. The entrepreneurs support one another at the 5th Street Arcades by shopping for their goods and services. The culture, skills, and the backgrounds of the individuals are reflective in many of their business concepts.  The goods that are locally-made and sold are one of a kind and cannot be purchase anywhere else. The economic benefits of the dollars that are earned by the entrepreneurs recycle back in the community vs if the stores were operated by only minimum wage employees of national chains. All of the businesses are locally-owned, no national chains. By repurposing and rebranding the building, new life has been brought to the space. The architectural design of the interior and exterior provides a new home for the “retail incubator.“ Prior to this project, the building was was mostly used by office workers as a pass through during inclement weather to connect from one block to the next.  Today, it is a retail destination that has provided employment opportunities for those starting a new business.

Read More HERE!

Progression Place- Creative Financing NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to DC Housing Enterprises, Four Points LLC and CRM, LLC on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Creative Finance Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Progression Place – Washington, DC

The Four Points, LLC  developed Progression Place a new Headquarter for the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) on six (6) vacant lots containing approximately 1.17 acres, at the Northeast corner of 7th and S Streets, NW.  The project site is located directly above the Shaw- Howard University Metrorail Stop and located minutes away from Howard University. The project comprises of: a mixed-use, transit-oriented development with approximately 103,083 GSF of office space; 24,343 GSF storefront retail; 205 apartments; and a 194-space, below-grade parking structure. UNCF will own and occupy a 50,000 square foot space in the project’s office component, which space would serve as their headquarters, and a retail space in which UNCF would operate the UNCF College of Knowledge Center, a resource center for local residents and visitors of the District.

Among the project’s proposed community benefits, the storefront retail includes leased space to local tenants, and 51 apartment units that would be reserved for families with incomes equal to 30%-120% AMI. In addition, the 194-space, below-grade garage which satisfies the parking requirements for this project, as well as the redeveloped Howard Theatre which occupies the same square block.

Progression Place plays a key role in linking this section of the city to the newly developed and revitalized 14th Street and U street corridor.  This project  capitalizes on the unique qualities of the Shaw/Ledroit Park Historic District, which includes the Howard Theatre and many other historic sites.  The financing structure includes, NMTCs, HUD FHA Mortgage Insurance, Housing Production Trust Fund, Commercial loan and grant funding from the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning.

Read More HERE!

 

Mechanics & Farmers’ Bank Redevelopment- Creative Financing NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to The City of Bridgeport and Forstone Capital, LLC on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Creative Finance Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Mechanics & Farmers’ Bank Redevelopment – Bridgeport, CT

Approximately 20 years ago, the Downtown Bridgeport area was experiencing disinvestment, resulting in vacant and underused buildings.  One of the more prominent vacant buildings in the area was the Mechanics and Farmers Bank on Main Street.   This masonry and stone neoclassical style building had been vacant for 25 years and during the winter months would become a target for those seeking shelter. In the last 10 years, various stakeholders worked together to reinvent the downtown commercial corridor that included updated zoning and infrastructure improvements.   The reconfiguration of the Commuter Rail Station that included the relocation and expansion of the City’s main bus terminal to better serve the downtown area was 1 block way from the Mechanics and Farmers Bank.  And directly across the street from the bank was then renovated historic Mclevy Green park which was now becoming a hub of cultural and social activity for the downtown area that includes summer concerts, ethnic celebrations; and public art events.

The Mechanics and Farmers Bank project is the reactivation of Historic Building in a downtown Transit-oriented development (TOD) area that utilized a Mixed-Use program and Mixed-income Housing components.   The building is a 40,000 square foot historical building located on Main Street and features oversized columns across its marble, granite and brick façade.

The adjoining building on State Street is a non-historical building of 20,000 square feet. The two properties are located in Bridgeport Downtown South Historical District.   The City had taken title to the vacant properties which needed significant work and issued an RFP in 2009 and Forstone Capital became the successful bidder.   After acquisition, Forstone located an anchor tenant for the project and created a $18 million historic renovation project with mixed-use programming.    Project consists of 20,000 SF feet of commercial office space for the architectural firm of Fletcher Thompson, 2,000 SF retail space and 30 units 1-bedroom mixed-income housing.  The redevelopment plan connected the two properties into a single project that respected the historical nature of the bank building while creating modern layouts in the rest of the project. The result is an impressive renovation of the old bank building that retains the historical fabric of property while seamlessly connecting it to other modern areas in the project.

Residential living downtown, prior to the last decade, was primarily limited to a low-income housing co-op and two high-rise senior complexes.  A daytime population of approximately 10,000 and nighttime population of 2,400 proved challenging in attracting retailers that served both the populations. Downtown Revitalization was recognized as the first step in the city’s re-emergence two decades ago. Early efforts focused transportation infrastructure and streetscape improvements.   Efforts have shifted the revitalization of the Main Street corridor itself with the intent of attracting residences and businesses into the downtown area.   The Mechanics and Farmers Bank Redevelopment project was one of the early City supported projects coming out of the 2007 vision of the downtown area. The project was not only a catalyst for the 12 redevelopment projects in the downtown area at various stages of construction today; it has also become a model for a number of projects that followed. New construction or substantial rehabilitation of existing structures in Downtown Bridgeport can be challenging due to achievable market rents.  Many of the projects here cannot be financed using conventional debt and equity products and need more innovative approach to close the gap.    NDC was a collaborator on the Mechanics and Farmers project and worked on the development of a more robust capital stack that included lower cost funding sources targeted to specific parts of the project.    Part of challenge of reactivating older historical structure is the real estate tax burden and its effect on debt underwriting.   NDC advised developing a tax PILOT solution based on the Effective Gross Income of the project.  This allowed increases in the real estate tax that would not be disruptive to the debit structure.   This PILOT solution has since been incorporated into 4 other redevelopment projects in the downtown area.

Read More HERE!

Lancaster Urban Village- Creative Financing NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to The City of Dallas, City Wide Community Development Corporation (CWCDC) and Urban Lancaster Community Development Corporation (ULCDC) on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Creative Finance Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

 

Lancaster Urban Village – Dallas, TX

Lancaster Urban Village (LUV) development is a transit oriented development (TOD) with mixed-income multifamily housing units that will serve the needs of persons newly employed in the area as well as those currently employed in the area and with mixed-use retail. The project includes activities that increase economic opportunity principally for low- and moderate-income persons by creating permanent jobs and providing affordable housing accessible to both existing and planned jobs in the project area. LUV is located across the street from the Veteran’s Administration (VA) Medical Center, the second largest system in the country, which serves over 113,000 veterans a year, with over one million outpatient episodes per year, and employs some 4,700 people.  The hospital also serves as a major research center and teaching facility.  LUV also provides transportation connections via the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Blue Line light rail station at the VA stop.

The Lancaster Urban Village development is the first of four development projects planned for the City of Dallas Neighborhood Investment Program (NIP) Lancaster Corridor Target Area.  The commercial portion of the Lancaster Urban Village development delivers 13,926 square feet of retail, restaurant, small office and commercial space and a 405-space parking garage to the NIP

Lancaster Corridor area, which generates permanent jobs and goods and services for the area. The housing component of the project provides 193 mixed-income, multi-family rental units with 51.8% (100 units) of the units rent-restricted for 15 years for affordability to low- to moderate-income persons.

LUV increases economic opportunity principally for low- and moderate-income persons, creates permanent jobs, and provides affordable housing accessible to both existing and planned jobs, and creates retail, restaurant, small office and commercial space that provide goods and services to the surrounding community. The commercial aspects of the project meet the national objective of benefiting low- and moderate-income persons by providing job creation through commercial development that will create employment opportunities in which a minimum of 72 permanent full-time equivalent jobs will be created for low- and moderate-income persons.  These jobs will be held by individuals with incomes at 80% or less of the Dallas area median family income (AMFI) established by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).  In addition to providing permanent full-time jobs, any community-serving businesses generated by the project will also provide goods and services to the 11,369 low- and moderate-income residents in the NIP Lancaster Corridor area. The potential is great for Lancaster Urban Village to spur economic growth in the region. The development’s close proximity to the VA Medical Center will appeal to the housing needs of the hospital’s employees.  And its new commercial space and retail will be a draw for the more than 30,000 annual visitors to the hospital area.

Read More HERE!

Island Employee Cooperative- Creative Financing NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to CEI  on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Creative Finance Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Island Employee Cooperative – Stonington, ME

After 43 years in business, the owners of Burnt Cove Market, V&S Variety, and The Galley, all based on Deer Isle, Maine, decided to sell their stores. When a viable buyer didn’t materialize, the employees organized themselves into a worker cooperative, negotiated a purchase and sale agreement with the owners, and purchased the three stores. The Island Employee Cooperative (IEC) is now Maine’s largest worker co-op and the second largest in New England. The IEC employs 60 island residents, 45 of whom are member/owners. Burnt Cove Market and The Galley are grocery stores, one in Stonington and one in Deer Isle, the two towns on Deer Isle. V&S Variety offers a wide range of items from greeting cards, fabric, house wares, small appliances, clothes, and everyday hardware and tools, as well as housing a pharmacy. Burnt Cove Market also sells gas. In sum, these businesses provide a large majority of the products needed to survive on this isolated island community. A team of financial institutions, service providers, and technical assistance providers (core TA at time of closing was over 2800 hours!) worked together to complete the conversion and purchase in 12 months, a short time given the complexity of the project. Cooperative development had to occur in tandem with financial and business planning. The seller was supportive provided the transaction happened quickly. The successful completion of the project maintained local ownership and 60 jobs, buffered the stores from off-island competition, and ensured vital economic activity would continue on-island.

Three items are particularly notable about this transaction: (1) creative financing; (2) the development of a succession planning model for independent grocers in rural communities; (3) and the concurrent development of a worker cooperative conversion model. The project demonstrates a powerful way to maintain community assets and empower local workers

The purchase of these businesses by the IEC provided a “win-win-win.” The sellers gained a succession plan that will allow them a comfortable retirement; the employees have the opportunity to build wealth through ownership; and ownership stayed local, keeping operations and profits on the island.

  • Transfer of ownership to 45 former employees and the creation of a democratic ownership structure: these individuals live and work on-island, which will keep money revolving locally as well as deepen the ties and capacity of the IEC to serve both residents and summer visitors. The new owners participate in running the business and get an equitable share of the proceeds.
  • Ongoing technical assistance: Current TA providers are under contract to the IEC for 5 years to ensure the strength of the governance and business capacity of the coop. An advisory body has been formed. In addition, following an assessment process, workforce development trainings are planned in conjunction with regional partners. These training opportunities provide professional development for the employees and will build real, transferable skills.
  • Food access, a priority of CEI’s, has been maintained on the island. In addition, the IEC is working with local producers, both farmers and value-add, to provide market outlets and highlight their products.
  • Owners will build equity through purchase of Class A (voting) and Class B shares. In time, the coop may decide to sell additional Class B shares to the community, further deepening ties.
  • Models of succession planning for independent grocers and worker cooperative conversion.
  • While there is no initial environmental impact, the IEC is currently developing a plan to switch out old equipment for new energy efficient units (i.e. refrigerated cases) and developing plans to capture sales leakage off-island which would reduce vehicle miles traveled, among other strategies.

 Read More HERE!

NDC Publishes Comments to Tax Reform

On April 15, 2015 NDC submitted comments to the US Senate Finance Committee Tax Working Groups, Community Development & Infrastructure on Tax Reform. Our submission can be found in the link below, read more and SHARE YOUR PROJECTS using #NDCACT on Twitter and Facebook.

NationalDevelopmentCouncil_SFCcomments

 

Building Communities, Changing Lives- Creative Financing NDC Academy Award Semi-Finalist

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Congratulations to Southern Bancorp Community Partners on being selected as a semi-finalist in the Creative Finance Category for the NDC Academy Awards 2015. The NDC Academy Awards Semi-Finalists represent some of the most innovative and impactful developments changing the lives for residents in underserved communities across the country, NDC is honored to highlight the achievements of these organizations at the NDC Academy 2015.

Building Communities, Changing Lives – Little Rock, AR

Net worth drives economic opportunity for people and communities. As individuals become economically empowered, the local community benefits through increased economic activity, job creation, and an overall higher quality of life. Southern Bancorp Community Partners (SBCP), a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) loan fund, in affiliation with Southern Bancorp Bank (SBB; collectively, Southern), a mission-oriented bank and CDFI, has developed and continues to refine a sustainable and scalable CDFI model that focuses upon economically distressed rural communities in Arkansas and Mississippi. SBCP builds communities and changes lives by providing a road-map to help individuals build net worth through three primary routes: entrepreneurship, home-ownership, and savings–the economic opportunity pathways. SBCP supports entrepreneurship and small businesses, in order to increase the number of sustainable, well-paying jobs and empowers individuals to increase their savings and assets and become homeowners. SBCP works with SBB to create responsive, innovative financial products and financially-related development services for people (particularly low-income), small businesses, rural communities, and the un/underbanked, Because clustering economic activities in neighborhoods or communities creates synergy, SBCP provides a concentrated suite of programs and services in order to accelerate the success of development activities. SBCP staff guide small businesses on a personally tailored path towards economic opportunity and mobility by providing them with extensive pre-loan counseling, entrepreneurial education, workforce development, and creative financing. For individuals, SBCP offers a tailored combination of financial education, credit counseling, matched savings accounts, free tax preparation services, counseling and flexible financing for homeownership, and low or no cost checking accounts. Each pathway is unique, evolving, tested, and refined and features proven and promising new strategies based on needs and available opportunities.

Direct Community Impacts, changing lives!

One recent client includes a first-time homeowner from low-income Helena, Arkansas, who was otherwise unbankable because of her credit history. SBCP provided her with a personalized financial education and a matched savings account. She improved her credit and saved enough for a down payment, and Southern creatively financed a loan, so she could make the purchase. Another client, a non-profit that used its loan to pave the main street of Drew, Mississippi, which is located in Sunflower County, Mississippi, one of the poorest counties in the United States. Southern also helped Hoffinger Industries, an important employer in Helena, Arkansas, which would have closed its plant if Southern had not financed Hoffinger’s purchase by a group of employees.

READ MORE HERE!

NDC TO HONOR AWARD SEMI-FINALISTS WITH DAILY PROJECT HIGHLIGHT

The NDC Academy 2015 is quickly approaching! We would like to take the time to honor the projects that have been selected as Semi-Finalists for the NDC Academy Awards, by posting a daily blog highlighting each extraordinary project.  The NDC Academy Awards for project excellence in the categories of Community Development, Housing Development, Creative Financing and Job Creation are recognized as the affirmation of “best in class” of projects nation-wide. Semi-finalists will present their deal at the NDC Academy in Washington, DC, one project in each category will be awarded the top honor at the NDC Academy Awards Luncheon. Read more…

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